Preparedness Tip Wednesday: 15 Tips from FEMA Part 2



15 Preparedness Tips from FEMA Part 2



Preparedness Tip #9Practice. Conduct fire drills and practice evacuating your home twice a year. Drive your planned evacuation route and plot alternate routes on a map in case main roads are blocked or gridlocked. Practice earthquake and tornado drills at home, school and work. Commit a weekend to update telephone numbers, emergency supplies and review your plan with everyone.
Preparedness Tip #10
  • A community working together during an emergency makes sense.
  • Talk to your neighbors about how you can work together during an emergency.
  • Find out if anyone has specialized equipment like a power generator, or expertise such as medical knowledge, that might help in a crisis.
  • Decide who will check on elderly or disabled neighbors.
  • Make back-up plans for children in case you can’t get home in an emergency.
  • Sharing plans and communicating in advance is a good strategy
Preparedness Tip #11What if disaster strikes while you’re at work?  Do you know the emergency preparedness plan for your workplace?  While many companies have been more alert and pro-active in preparing for disasters of all types since the September 11, 2001 attacks, a national survey indicates that many employees still don’t know what their workplace plan is for major or minor disasters. If you don’t know yours, make a point to ask. Know multiple ways to exit your building, participate in workplace evacuation drills, and consider keeping some emergency supplies at the office. Visit www.ready.gov and click on Ready Business for more information about business preparedness.
Preparedness Tip #12You should keep enough supplies in your home to meet the needs of you and your family for at least three days. Build an emergency supply kit to take with you in an evacuation. The basics to stock in your portable kit include: water, food, battery-powered radio and flashlight with extra batteries, first aid supplies, change of clothing, blanket or sleeping bag, wrench or pliers, whistle, dust mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape, trash bags, map, a manual can opener for canned food and special items for infants, elderly, the sick or people with disabilities. Keep these items in an easy to carry container such as a covered trash container, a large backpack, or a duffle bag.
Preparedness Tip #13Preparing for emergencies needn’t be expensive if you’re thinking ahead and buying small quantities at a time. Make a list of some foods that:
  • Have a long shelf-life and will not spoil (non-perishable).
  • You and your family like.
  • Do not require cooking.
  • Can be easily stored.
  • Have a low salt content as salty foods will make you more thirsty.
Keep the list in your purse or wallet and pick up a few items each time you’re shopping and/or see a sale until you have built up a well-stocked supply that can sustain each member of your family for at least three days following an emergency.
Preparedness Tip #14Take a minute to check your family’s first aid kit, and note any depleted items — then, add them to your shopping list. Don’t have a first aid kit? Add that to the list or build a kit yourself.  Just add the following items to your shopping list and assemble a first aid kit. Consider creating a kit for each vehicle as well:
  • First Aid Kits – Assemble a first aid kit for your home and one for each car.
  • (20) adhesive bandages, various sizes
  • 5″ x 9″ sterile dressing
  • conforming roller gauze bandage
  • triangular bandages
  • 3 x 3 sterile gauze pads
  • 4 x 4 sterile gauze pads
  • roll 3″ cohesive bandage
  • germicidal hand wipes or waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • (6) antiseptic wipes
  • pair large medical grade non-latex gloves
  • Adhesive tape, 2″ width
  • Anti-bacterial ointment
  • Cold pack
  • Scissors (small, personal)
  • Tweezers
  • CPR breathing barrier, such as a face shield
  • First Aid Manual
  • Non-Prescription and Prescription Drugs
  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever
  • Anti-diarrhea medication
  • Antacid (for stomach upset)
  • Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting if advised by the Poison Control Center)
  • Laxative
  • Activated charcoal (use if advised by the Poison Control Center)
  • Prescription drugs, as recommended by your physician, and copies of the prescriptions in case they need to be replaced
  • For more information about first aid kits, visit www.redcross.org.

Preparedness Tip #15Keep at least a three-day supply of water per person. Store a minimum of one gallon of water per person per day (two quarts for drinking, two quarts for food preparation and sanitation). Store water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. Avoid using containers that will decompose or break, such as milk cartons or glass bottles. A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water each day. Hot environments and strenuous activity can double that amount. Children, nursing mothers, and people who are sick will also need more.

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